Daily Calendar

11 October 2010

Captain John Watts

I recently found out that our family is a descendant of Captain/Trader John Watts. John Watts was born in 1728. There is somewhat of a dispute as to where, so I won't list that at this time. He was apparently married to (1) Gi-Yo-Sti-Ko-Yo Raven of the Bird Clan and (2) Wurteah Corn Tassel. John and Gi-Yo-Sti-Ko-Yo had Barsheba Watts, ancestor of our family. Interestingly, John and Wurteah had John Watts, Jr., who was a Chief of the Chickamauga Cherokees.

Barsheba Watts married William Gulledge. Alice Gulledge was their daughter and she married Jason Rushing. Our family descends from Alice Gulledge and Jason Rushing like this: Jason Rushing > Asa Rushing > Elizabeth Caroline Rushing > Nancy Elizabeth Dees > George Warren Washington Wise > Nancy Jane Wise > Sandra Caroline Wise > Michael David Freels.

The subject of interest for today is John Watts. Quite an interesting fellow to say the least. His marriage to Gi-Yo-Sti-Ko-Yo Raven provides us with still another Cherokee connection. The following is borrowed from the following website:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnpolk2/watts.htm

John Watts, Interpreter & Trader


John Watts : Indian trader & Interpreter

John Watts, like William Elder and Thomas Nightingale, may have come to South
Carolina via Virginia. Watts was a minor figure in the Indian trade in the 1740’s,
and he was connected to both Elder(s) and Nightingale, as well as John Amory
(d.1746). In the 1750’s, as the prior generation of Indian traders retired, he took on a larger role. He was born c.1720, married a Cherokee, and resided in the Ninety Six settlement in the early 1750’s. He was acquainted with John Vann
and probably John Welch. In 1751 Vann and Watts fled with their families from
Ninety Six. [SC Commons Journal of 13 May 1751.]

When William Emory came down from the Cherokee Nation with his family c.1754 he located his family close to John Watts. They seem to have been
connected by their Cherokee wives because the mixed blood Cherokees John
Jolly (an Emory descendant) and John Watts were said to have the same uncle.
The lack of direct marriage between Emory and Watts grandchildren is a slight
indication of close clan relationship. A more “mythic” connection is that John
Watts went with the group of Lower Cherokee “to be heard by the king” in 1752
and in that group was the mother of John Emory (b.1744). The main group got
to Williamsburg, Virginia, but family legend has it that John Emory’s mother was
taken to England and she died at sea or in England, in either case, never to
return. (She may have just died in Virginia.)

Around 1753 John Watts Jr. was born at Ninety Six. He would return with the Emory family to the Cherokee Nation and would become a Chickamauga warrior
under Will Emory, and later become the military leader of the Chickamauga.

John Watts Sr. married a white wife in Charleston in 1754: Jossie Stuart, but
continued to spend much of his time among the Cherokee. He went with the
Cherokee to New York in 1755. [SC Docs Ind. Affairs (3) : 336]

He had children by his white wife Stuart, including sons Thomas and John, who
settled in the Abbeville (Old 96) District (South Carolina) on Turkey Creek, on the trading path (Keowee Road). (He had these lands by royal grant):

62. Robertson, William 220 acres 96th Dist on south side of Turkey Creek of Saluda River. Surv. Feb 16, 1793 by Adam C. Jones, Jr. DS. Recorded Aug 1, 1793. Plat: Wm and Robt. Robertson, John Cullin, Henry Holtzclaw, John Watts, south fork Turkey Creek.

63. Robinson, William, 250 acres 96th Dist on branch of Turkey Creek. Surv Mary 5, 1785 by John Bowie, DS. Plat: James Dunn, John Shirley, William Canady, William Stuart, vacant.



64. Rutledge, John 213 acres Abbeville County, 96th Dist. on Turkey Creek. Surv. Jan 9, 1793 by Adam C. Jones, Jr. DS. Recorded Feb 27, 1793. Platt: Andrew Russell Rutledge, Thomas Shirley, Thomas Norwood, John Maxwell, Patrick Cunningham, Thomas Watts, Turkey Creek, vacant, bounded.

65. Shirley, Benjamin 200 acres on waters of Turkey Creek a branch of Saluda River. Surv July 24, 1784 by John Bowie, DS. Platt: Keowee Road, fork of Turkey Creek, James Smith, William Robinson. [from research of Glee Corey Hendrix on the Shirley family]

(Apparently some white descendents of John Watts are coming forward and making it difficult to sort out who’s who among the Watts because there were both white and mixed Thomas Watts, Joseph Watts and John Watts and the mixed blood Joseph resided in central Georgia as white.) [Whites, p. 41]

John Watts also went with the Lower Cherokee to Virginia to fight the “French” Indians and is mentioned by George Washington in a letter.
[Papers of George Washington, 5:124; also SC Docs Ind. Affairs (3) : 336-7, 413]


John Watts served briefly as an interpreter at Fort Loudon but was branded “a
dangerous person” by the fort commander. [SC Docs Ind. Affairs (3) : 335]
During the Cherokee war he led a militia company. [ Murtie June Clark, Soldiers, ]

He is also said to be at Fort Loudon (along with William Shorey) during the
siege, and was one of those taken care of by his Cherokee wife.

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v016/v016p003.html

He brought Attakullakulla, Willenawaw, the Raven of Hiwassee, “Halfbreed Will”
(Will Emory) and a few others under a flag of truce to talk to military leaders of the Grant Expedition on 28 August 1761. [ Journal of Capt. French, online]

He was a translator and witness of a 1763 treaty in Georgia and later was hired
by Christopher Guest (Gist), a Virginia trader.

He was known as Captain John Watts, as was his son (the Chickamauga leader)
and his grandson (on the 1817 tribal census and the 1835 removal census).

In a 1770 speech, Attakullakulla remarked that “when Mr. Watts was a Young Man, he traded cheap, but now Goods are much dearer.” [19 Oct 1770]


Three Generations of John Watts

John Watts b.c.1720 d. 1771 (white)



John Watts b.1753 d.c.1806? (mixed) – Chickamauga warrior, leader
was at the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals 1775 as Young Tassel, Kunokeski
signed the Treaty of Holston 2 July 1791 as “Kunoskeskie, or John Watts”
led an attack on Knoxville 17 Oct 1793 signed the Treaty of Tellico 25 Oct 1805 as “Katigiskee”? signed the Treaty of Tellico 27 Oct 1805 as “Kutigeskee”?



John Watts b.c.1785 d.c. 1854? (mixed) – Trail of Tears emigrant signed the Treaty of Tellico 25 Oct 1805 as “John Watts, Jr”



“Kitagusta / Kitagunsta” – a clue to the mother of John Watts?

Chief John Watts b.1753 went by the name Kitagusta or, in a different dialect,
Kutigeeskee. This definitely links him to the family of Old Kitagunsta, Kitagusta
who was also called Great Eagle, Willenawaw. (See index for cross reference.)


Notes on John Watts by Ginny Mangum


Descendants of Trader/Interpreter John Watts

Compiled on March 28, 2002 by:
Ginny Mangum
Contact at vscissorlady@aol.com

Research is still being conducted on John Watts who was born about 1720 in, some researchers say Scotland, some say Bowling Green, VA. We know that he died between October 20, 1770 and March 4, 1771. He worked October 13 - 20, 1770 for a meeting between principal Cherokee Chiefs and John Stuart about a boundary line with Virginia. (Gage Papers #5317 137:10). In a letter dated April 29, 1771 from Alexander Cameron to John Stuart about a March 4, 1771 meeting, it mentioned that John Watts was deceased!! (Gage Papers #5295 102).

John Watts was first hired by Christian Quest, grandfather of Sequoia, to work for the Virginia Land Company. He was known as a Virginia Trader; they worked out of Charleston, S.C. Researcher Robert D. Epps (see Watts Genforum Message Board, #2001, http://genforum.genealogy.com/watts), says “In 1754 a John Watts married a Joppe Stuart in Charleston, S.C. John and Charles Stuart were British Indian agents into the Cherokee Nation. John Watts worked as an interpreter for them. Most likely there is a Town Family, as well as the Native American Family.” Could this be true???
John Watts entered the original Cherokee county about the middle of the 18th century (prior to 1750). As an interpreter, he accompanied Ammonscossitte, Young Emperor of the Cherokees, on a trip from Tellico in Tennessee to Williamsburg, Virginia in 1752. (See, “The CHEROKEE FRONTIER: CONFLICT AND SURVIVAL”, by David Corkran, page 437). He also served Captain Raymond Demere as interpreter during the building of British Fort Loudon in 1756-1757. During this time, he was accused of stirring up trouble between the Cherokees and the white settlers. In a letter from Littleton to Demere, Littleton says, “I’m well convinced that this talk proceeded from something that was told the Indians by John Elliot and John Watts. Watts speaks their language well. Elliott and Watts are a couple of dangerous people.” (Old Frontiers by J. P. Brown).
As stated in “Diplomacy and the Indian Gifts” by Wilbur Jacobs, John Watts was in New York December 2 - 17, 1755 with Thomas Pownall, Olivery Delancy, Goldbrow Banyar, Daniel Claus and Peter Wraxall to plan the downfall of Sir William Shirle. . . .

From the book, “John Stuart and the Southern Colonial Frontier”, by John Richard Alden, we find that in 1757, John Watts was a supervisor of parties of Cherokees and Catawabas coming into Virginia, along with Richard Smith and Thomas Rutherford, all of whom were given the titles of “Conductors and Guides”. The book also mentions that in 1761, John Watts escorted Tistoe of Keowee, and Slavecatcher of Tomotley back to Ouconnostotah. John at the time was Captain in the Provincial Rangers.
In 1763, John Watts acted as interpreter at the treaty of Augusta, as mentioned in “Tennesse during the Revolutionary War”, by Samuel Cole Williams. . . .

There is a lot of speculation as to the actual wife of John Watts. Some say she is the daughter of Chief Atakullakulla and some say she is the daughter of Chief Great Eagle. J. P. Brown, in his book “Old Frontiers”, says that John Watts married the sister of Chiefs Old Tassel, Doublehead, and Pumpkin Boy. Their other sister was Wurteh (mother of Sequoah). I have seen her name as: Xaiyantshee, Onitositah, Kay-i-o, GHI-GO-NE-II, etc. Research will continue. . ..



CHIEF JOHN WATTS:
FROM "WHO WAS WHO AMONG THE SOUTHERN INDIANS, A GENEALOGICAL NOTEBOOK", 1698-1907 by Don Martini: Watts, John - Cherokee Chief, was born in 1753, the son of Trader John Watts. Also known as Kettiegesta, he was for many years a leading chief of the warlike Chickamauga faction of Cherokees that waged war on the American Frontier. He fought against John Sevier at Boyd's Creek in 1780. Two years later, he served as a guide for Sevier, but he led the General's troops from the Chickamauga towns. In May, 1792, he was described as a "bold, sensible, and friendly half breed" and as a "stout, bold and enterprising man". Despite all the compliments by the Americans, he continued to wage war on the frontier. He was severely wounded in a raid on Buchanan's Station, near Nashville, on September 30, 1792. While recuperating, he met with Governor William Blount of the Southwest Territory at Henry's Station, near Long Island on the Holston, in April, 1793. After his daughter was killed by whites on June 16, 1793, he again went on the warpath. In September, 1793, he, Doublehead, and James Vann led 1000 warriors toward Knoxville, only to abort the raid. He is said to have joined Chief Bowl and others in the attack on whites at Muscle Shoals in June, 1794. In November, 1794, following Major James Ore's successful invasion of the Chickamauga towns, Watts and other Cherokees sued for peace. In December 1796, he visited President Washington in Philadelphia, and in October, 1800, he met with Moravian missionaries at Spring Place. He signed the treaty of 1805. Once described as the greatest ballplayer in the Cherokee Nation, he died either on the Mississippi River about 1805 or at Willstown (AL), with burial there. He was a brother to Unacata and to a Cherokee killed at Boyd's Creek, and was the father of John Watts, Big Rattlinggourd, and perhaps Hard Mush (Gatunuali).
From page 353 of Old Frontiers, by J. P. Brown: “Chief John Watts was described by Governor Blount as “unquestionably the leading man in his Nation.” He possessed a talent for making friends, red and white. William Martin, son of General Joseph Martin, said of him, “He was one of the finest looking men I ever saw, large of stature, bold and magnanimous, a great friend of my father’s.” Major G. W. Sevier states: “He was a noble looking Indian, always considered a generous and honorable enemy,” and other pioneers paid high tribute to his “engaging personality.”
It is said that Chief John was married at least two or three times. I have seen several names that could be his wives but must research this further.

http://www.angelfire.com/home/spiritofthedove/ginnyswattsinfo.html


Note: some online sources claim that Chief John Watts (b.1753) was actually a son of Old Tassel and therefore a claimant to the “throne” of Moytoy. This
fanciful nonsense plagues the descendants of Chickamaugans. This is based
on the fact that Chief Watts was called Young Tassel in 1775.





Watts among the Cherokees

The Watts name disappears in the east after the Trail of Tears. The descendents who remained (in Georgia or Alabama) simply blended into the general population. John Watts (b.1785) was placed in Cherokee prison when
he went west and was stripped of his tribal membership. (Pardoned and restored
after his death.) A few Watts appear on the western rolls.

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v016/v016p003.html#24


Page 24

so famous that white mothers would say to their children, "Captain Bench will get you if you are not good." John Watts, another nephew of Old Tassel, was roused to frenzy by the treacherous death of his uncle, and could not mention the matter for years thereafter without shedding tears.

Following the collapse of the Franklin movement, John Sevier was arrested and carried to North Carolina to be tried for treason. During his absence, Joseph Martin, Brigadier General of the frontier militia, led an army of five hundred in an unsuccessful attempt to destroy the Five Lower Towns. A successful ambush at the pass of Lookout Mountain forced the white army back in dismay, followed closely by an avenging horde of warriors who spread terror on the border. In October, 1788, Gillespie's Fort, a small station on Little Tennessee River, was taken by storm, and twenty people lost their lives. A defiant note was left at the burning ruins, signed by John Watts, Bloody Fellow, Kitegisky, and Glass, warning the white settlers to move off Indian lands within thirty days. An index of the character of the border warfare may be had in the action of Bloody Fellow, who, when he lost his brother through what he considered white treachery, took fifteen scalps in revenge.

The Cherokees had long ago discontinued, in active warfare, the use of gatsodi-ale-dacleda-taw, the bow and arrows. Although the bow, at short range, was probably more deadly than the defective guns handled by the traders, the white man's weapon was used whenever it could be procured. That fact was most unfortunate from the standpoint of the Cherokees, for it made them dependent entirely upon outside sources for their ammunition. Thus the failure of ammunition at the second Battle of Etchoe Pass enabled Grant to win his campaign. There is little doubt that the conquest of the Indian country would have been long delayed had the red warrior stuck to his ancient weapons.

Up to and during the American Revolution, the Cherokees secured their ammunition from the English. The close of the American Revolution would have automatically ended the Indian

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wars by shutting off their supplies of powder and ball, but for one reason.

By the terms of the treaty which ended the Revolution, Spain was awarded Florida, and as she already owned Louisiana, this gave her control of the mouth of the Mississippi and navigation on that great stream. Spain was determined to maintain that control. She regarded the western American settlements as a menace to it, and was willing, even anxious, that they be destroyed. To that end, Spain supplied the Indians with unlimited ammunition, "to be had for the asking," and the Cherokees were enabled to carry on.

North Carolina in 1789 ceded its western lands to Congress, which organized the Territory South of the River Ohio, comprising the present Tennessee. William Blount, friend of Washington and member of the convention which had just framed the Constitution of the United States, was named Governor.

Governor Blount took up his duties in 1790. His first act was an attempt to end the Indian war by diplomacy. He announced that he would rectify the wrongs done the Indians. Hence, practically every chief of prominence, with the lone exception of Dragging Canoe, attended Blount's Treaty of Holston in 1791.

The Indians had understood that Blount would remove white settlers from Indian land. They were bitterly disappointed when, instead of removing the settlers, he proposed to buy the land which had been wrongfully taken. Watts and Bloody Fellow, who spoke for the Cherokees, protested. Watts, overcome by the memory of the treacherous death of his uncle, withdrew from the treaty. Blount offered the Cherokees some presents, and an annunity of $1000.00 for the land. "It would not buy a breech clout for each member of my Nation!" Bloody Fellow replied; but signed the treaty, feeling himself under duress. Without consulting Blount further, he set out at the head of a delegation for Philadelphia to attempt to secure better terms from the President. The effort resulted in an increase of the Cherokee annuity to $1500.00 per year; and Washington conferred upon Bloody Fellow a new name,

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Eskaqua, meaning "Clear Sky."26 Thereafter, he was a friend to the Americans.

While Bloody Fellow was in Philadelphia, Dragging Canoe died, in March, 1792. John Watts was elected his successor as War Chief. Watts was a magnetic personality, an eloquent orator, and a man of proven bravery. The Cherokees flocked to his banner with even more enthusiasm than to that of Dragging Canoe. In addition, a large number of Creek warriors placed themselves under his command. It was a stirring scene when Watts, at the great council at Willstown in September, 1792, threw the weight of his influence into the scales, and announced "To war we will go together.!"

Watts was determined to prove that Indians could "fight in armies" as well as white men. His plan of campaign was well thought out. He proposed to throw the whole strength of the Nation against the Cumberland settlements, wipe them out, then turn eastward and repeat the process at Watauga. He himself marched against Nashville at the head of three hundred warriors. To block assistance or word of his coming, Doublehead was sent with a hundred men to lie in wait upon the Kentucky road. Middlestriker, with the same number, was sent to cover the new Cumberland road, a shorter route just opened from Knoxville to Nashville. Middlestriker intercepted and defeated a band of forty white militia on the way to Nashville, capturing the commander, Captain Samuel Handley. Doublehead found the Kentucky road almost deserted, took a couple of scalps, and departed post-haste for Nashville to assist in the attack.

Two days later he camped at Horseshoe Bend of Caney Fork River. His men scattered to hunt, leaving a single sentry at the camp. About noon, Captain William Snoddy in command of thirty-four militiamen, discovered and plundered the camp. The sentry escaped, and feeling sure that he would be attacked, Snoddy chose a strong position, protected on three sides by a high bluff, and went into camp for the night. It soon began to drizzle rain.

26The word Eskaqua is from the Shawnee. In Cherokee, Clear Sky would be Galunladi-yiga.
Page 27

The men were kept at high tension throughout the night by Doublehead assembling his warriors. The howl of a wolf, answered by the scream of a panther, the hoot of an owl, or the bark of a fox, culminated about daybreak with a terrific yell, followed by profound silence. Four of Snoddy's men bolted in terror, and were seen no more. At daylight, Doublehead attacked. A desperate hand to hand struggle, lasting an hour, ensued. Doublehead lost thirteen men, and Snoddy four. The Indians withdrew eventually, and proceeded toward Nashville. That day, Doublehead was met by two runners who informed him that Watts had failed, and was being carried, mortally wounded, to Willstown. Doublehead, scourge of the frontier, wept. "Vengeance I will have for Watts!" he said.

The Indian campaign had indeed failed. Watts had with him numerous Creek allies under Talotiskee of Broken Arrow; and thirty Shawnees under Shawnee Warrior. About dark on September 30, 1792, the Indians approached Buchanan's Station, five miles east of Nashville. Watts insisted they they proceed to Nashville, which was the principal object of the campaign. His two allies objected to leaving white men in their rear. "Buchanan's must be taken first!" they argued. About midnight Watts consented. A furious assault, which lasted through the night, was made. No white men were killed, but the Indian loss was serious. Talotiskee and Shawnee Warrior were killed; as were Little Owl, Dragging Canoe's brother, and Kiachatalee, a brave young chief of Nickajack. Watts, desperately wounded, was placed upon a stretcher between two horses, and the Indian army retreated rapidly.

Watts recovered. The following year, 1793, he led an army of a thousand warriors against the settlements around Knoxville. Dissension with his uncle, Doublehead, delayed the march and gave the white settlers time to congregate in the forts. A small station, Cavett's, eight miles south of Knoxville, was surrounded. The inmates offered to surrender if their lives were spared. Watts, a humane man, readily agreed, the famous Captain Bench acting as interpreter. No sooner were the gates opened than Doublehead fell upon the helpless captives and murdered every one, regardless

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of the protests of Watts and other chiefs. The redoutable Bench wept, feeling that his honor had been betrayed, for he had promised the captives immunity. Watts abandoned the campaign, was pursued by John Sevier at the head of a large force, and was defeated at Etowah, site of the present Rome, Georgia.

Governor Blount, hoping to end the war, invited the leading chiefs to visit President Washington at Philadelphia. Doublehead was among those who accepted, and headed the delegation. The old warrior succeeded in having the Cherokee annuity raised to $5000.00 per year, and collected a year in advance which he distributed among his own followers.

In September, 1794, a white army from Nashville, headed by Col. James Ore, surprised and destroyed the towns of Nickajack and Running Water. About the same time General Wayne defeated the northern allies of the Cherokees; and Spain, pushed by the Napoleonic wars in Europe, withdrew support from the Indians. Watts, faced by the inevitable, made peace with the Americans. The implacable Doublehead returned about that time from Philadelphia, and although peace had been made, could not resist the temptation to make one more raid. He led a surprise attack upon the station of Valentine Sevier and killed fourteen people, in revenge, as he said, for what Sevier's brother "Chucky Jack" had done to the Cherokees.

Thereafter the Cherokees followed the white man's path and made war no more with the Americans.

Following the death of Old Tassel in 1788, the upper Cherokee towns recognized Scola-guta, Hanging Maw, as Peace Chief. He was not active until the close of the war, when Watts, the War Chief, retired to comparative seclusion at Willstown.27 Hanging Maw was then recognized generally as head of the tribe. The assassination of the Principal Chief, and steady encroachment of white settlers even south of the Little Tennessee, caused a general

27John Watts, respected and beloved by his people, continued to reside at Willstown, where he died about 1808. He is believed to have been buried in the cemetery now marked as the site of the Willstown Mission to the Cherokees, about two miles north of Fort Payne, Ala. His grave, however, is not marked.

I thought the following was interesting:

http://genforum.genealogy.com/watts/messages/5875.html

Just for everyone else, my current thinking is as follows:

Y-DNA tests prove some children attributed to John Watts, the Interpreter/Trader are, in fact, not related. Based on the DNA results the CANDIDATE genealogy appears to be:

FAMILY GROUP ONE:
John Watts, the Interpreter/Trader
John "Young Tassel" Watts,
John Joseph Watts
Thomas "Rattling Gourd"
Unacata
Probably some unknown daughters

All of these are pretty well documented as related in Cherokee Nation documents and historical documents from the Revolutionary War period. Records show most fought alongside the British.

FAMILY GROUP TWO:
William Watts and Jane Leigh (Candidate parents)
Malachi Watts
Garrett Z. Watts
Nancy Watts
Henry Watts
Benjamin Watts
Elizabeth Watts

Garrett is known to have fought in the NC patriots in the Revolutionary War.

Rationale:
1) In Family group one, all have Cherokee names associated with them. Family group two doesn't.
2) Malachi, b. 1793, and Clinton (both sons of Garrett Z. Watts) and Henry Watts (whom we believe to be a brother to Malachi) have matching Y-DNA
3) Since Garrett Z. named a son Malachi, I'm guessing it was for his brother, so Malachi's in our group. Since Malachi daughtered-out, we'll never get Y-DNA tests for his line.
4) Benjamin and Elizabeth are very common names in other lines whose Y-DNA matches Garrett and Henry.

The general consensus is that Barsheba or Bathsheba Watts is the daugher of Trader John Watts, although I have found no solid evidence to support this claim, other than a Will which seems to indicate a relationship between the Watts and the Rushing families.

http://genforum.genealogy.com/watts/messages/5628.html

As posted in this forum and elsewhere, Malichi Watts b. cir 1751 left a will around 1804 in which he establishes his children (living)
my Six Children
Elizabeth Phillips
Francis Garriott
Ann Dabbs
Polley Phillips
Sarah Alsobrook
Jemima Wood

He also lists his executor's and witnesses to the will. Interestingly enough, there seem to be strong Watts connections to these men as well.

Executors
Williamson Plant - found with children born in Anson NC, to have spouse Frances Watts-Connection to Malichi unknown.

Abraham Rushing Sr. - has second wife Sarah Watts
Sarah Watts MIGHT have been the Aunt of Frances Watts. This Sarah Watts was a widow as early as 1779 when husband Humphrey Gains died, and Sarah did not pass unitl 1803 though I do not have anything that tells me she came to NC or married again.

Witnesses
William Gulledge - wife is believed to be Bersheba Watts - unknown connection to Malichi

Thomas Gulledge is most likely William Gulledge's brother who I do not have any information on spouse - could there be a Watts connection or was it just as William's brother he was involved? This Thomas could be William's son who would have been around 25 years old. He married a Jane with unknown last name.

Can anyone establish a firmer connection in the Watts relationships of the executor's or witnesses of Malichi's will?

It is pretty widely accepted that Malachi is the son of Trader John Watts. Thus, there appears to have been a connection between the Gulledge family and the Watts family. Hence, Barsheba Watts is very possibly the daughter of Trader John Watts and a brother to Malachi Watts. Note the following:

http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?Barsheba::gulledge::443.html


Anyone heard of this research and can confirm or deny. I have heard that the wife of william gulledge (Barsheba Watts) had parents of John Watts and ??. Then I found this info:

Bathsheba Watts married William Gulledge 8.Children see William Gulledge[jhcarney.ged] Bathsheba was born between 1745 and 1750 (best info 1746) either in Edgecombe County or near Anson County, North Carolina. She married William Gulledge between 1770 and 1772 in Anson County. I strongly believe that she was a daughter of Trader John Watts who married Gi-Yo-Sti-Ko-Yo-He of the Bird Clan. They were the parents of John Watts, Jr. other wise known as Young Tassel. Evidence of this is the will of Malachi Watts (son of Trader John Watts) who died in Anson County, N.C. in 1804 and had William Gulledge as a witness to the will. Could Malachi Watts have been a brother to Bathsheba Watts Gulledge? Also William Gulledge and Bathsheba Watts had a son named Stephen Malachi Gulledge which is a clue. Additional Source from Chris A. Clark.

John Watts the Trader: This John Watts was an Indian trader with the Cherokee - He also acted as an interpreter for them in dealing with the U.S. Army, etc. Old Frontiers, John P. Brown, pg. 353:

....a white trader who served Captain Demere as interpreter during the building of Fort Loudon. His wife was the sister of Chief Doublehead, aka Old Tassel and Pumpkin Boy.

John Watts was first hired by Christian Quest, grandfather of Sequoia, to work for the Virginia Land Company. He was known as a Virginia Trader; they worked out of Charleston , S.C. Researcher Robert D. Epps (see Watts Genforum Message Board, #2001, http://genforum.genealogy.com/watts), says In 1754 a John Watts married a Joppe Stuart in Charleston , S.C. John and Charles Stuart were British Indian agents into the Cherokee Nation. John Watts worked as an interpreter for them. Most likely there is a Town Family, as well as the Native American Family."

John Watts entered the original Cherokee county about the middle of the 18th century (prior to 1750). As an interpreter, he accompanied Ammonscossitte, Young Emperor of the Cherokees, on a trip from Tellico in Tennessee to Williamsburg , Virginia in 1752. (See, "The CHEROKEE FRONTIER: CONFLICT AND SURVIVAL", by David Corkran, page 437). He also served Captain Raymond Demere as interpreter during the building of British Fort Loudon in 1756-1757. During this time, he was accused of stirring up trouble between the Cherokees and the white settlers. In a letter from Littleton to Demere, Littleton says, "I'm well convinced that this talk proceeded from something that was told the Indians by John Elliot and John Watts. Watts speaks their language well. Elliott and Watts are a couple of dangerous people." (Old Frontiers by J. P. Brown).

As stated in "Diplomacy and the Indian Gifts" by Wilbur Jacobs, John Watts was in New York December 2 - 17, 1755 with Thomas Pownall, Olivery Delancy, Goldbrow Banyar, Daniel Claus and Peter Wraxall to plan the downfall of Sir William Shirle. One of John's sons, Garrett Watts, was born on January 8, 1756 in Caroline County, VA. It doesn't seem possible that John would have made it back for the birthing. (As noted by Betty Watts, whose husband Noel E. Watts is a 4t h great grandson of Garrett.)

From the book, "John Stuart and the Southern Colonial Frontier", by John Richard Alden, we find that in 1757, John Watts was a supervisor of parties of Cherokees and Catawabas coming into Virginia, along with Richard Smith and Thomas Rutherford, all of whom were given the titles of "Conductors and Guides". The book also mentions that in 1761, John Watts escorted Tistoe of Keowee, and Slave catcher of Tomotley back to Ouconnostotah. John at the time was Captain in the Provincial Rangers.

In 1763, John Watts acted as interpreter at the treaty of Augusta, as mentioned in "Tennessee during the Revolutionary War", by Samuel Cole Williams. In 1767, John Watts accompanied Attokullalulla and Ouconnastotoah and their children , as mentor and interpreter, to Charleston. Stuart permitted only eight persons to go.

See "Who Was Among the Southern Indians, a Genealogical Notebook", 1698-1907, by Don Martini: Page 691: Watts, John - Cherokee Trader, lived at Ninety-Six, South Carolina in 1751. He was a British interpreter for the Cherokees at Fort Loudoun (S.C.) in 1758 and at Augusta in 1763, and continued to fill that position at the 1770 treaty negotiations. He died early in 1771, and was replaced by John Vann. Married to a sister of Doublehead, he was the father of Chief John Watts.

There is a lot of speculation as to the actual wife of John Watts. Some say she is the daughter of Chief Atakullakulla and some say she is the daughter of Chief Great Eagle. J . P. Brown, in his book "Old Frontiers", says that John Watts married the sister of Chief Old Tassel.

1 comment:

mdfreels said...
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